My dog has ate my medication, what do I do?

Our team is formed for veterinarians, ethologists, and animal health content experts.

How long does it take for a poisoned dog to die? What can we do if your dog has eaten a packet of antidepressant pills, pressure pills or diabetes medicine? If you're asking yourself these questions, it's because you think your friend has eaten something he should not. Instead of reading this article, what you have to do is run to the vet to have his stomach washed.

If you can, take a similar package of whatever pills he ate so that the doctor knows exactly what he is facing. In general, if your dog is in good health and the specialist act quickly to remove the poison, he will be saved. If you have any doubts, make your question to our online veterinarians: but seriously, go see the veterinarian now.

My dog ate my medication: blood pressure pill

There are a lot of medications that your dog might put in his mouth. Many PetLovers believe that, because dogs have the instinct of vomiting very developed and they do not smell food, they will not eat medications. Make no mistake. The furry ones are explorers and they use their tongue and their snouts to learn about the environment that surrounds them. They smell, they swallow, and then they vomit if they can, but they do not always do it and they can get intoxicated.

That is why it is not only worth putting your pills of blood pressure, wellbutrin or antibiotics in a high place, inside a drawer, or in a room where we believe that our friend can never enter. We have to keep all the medicines safely, in a place that is 100% impossible for them to find it. The pills for blood pressure, ibuprofen, or sleeping pills can be deadly to him or cause serious injuries to his liver.

My dog ate my diabetes medicine

Precisely due to the great number of consequences it can have on his health, it does not matter if you know which medicines are deadly for them and which ones are not. What you have to be clear is that you have to prevent this from happening. In case you see that he has eaten a medication, take him to the vet. The question is: What if I do not see him eat my contraceptive or sleeping pills? What you have to look for are the symptoms that your furry might show.

The truth is that the symptoms of poisoning by human drugs in dogs are similar to those that occur in people. One of the most typical signs that he has eaten something that he should not, if it was a narcotic, is that his pupils will be dilated. If you see this, he has been poisoned for sure.

The easiest to see is that your dog wobbles, as if he was drunk. It is also possible that some foam comes out of his mouth, that he complaints, snorts, and end up laying on the floor. If he needs it, he will puke. But when in doubt, you should not wait for these symptoms to manifest, nor should you try to find out which specific symptoms occur with each medication; just go to the vet.

My dog has eaten ibuprofen; can I try to make him vomit?

Of all the medications that are usually at home, one of the most common is ibuprofen. You have to know that this is one of the most toxic for our furry ones. The worrying thing is that it is easy to find online sites that recommend giving ibuprofen for your furry if something hurts. This is a dreadfully disastrous mistake. Each medicine is used for a specific thing and for a specific species.

If you give your dog ibuprofen, you will only get him intoxicated and cause serious damage. Another common mistake is to try to do a stomach wash by giving something that makes him vomit; or worse, sticking your fingers in his mouth to make him regurgitate. If he is nervous, he will end up biting you. You cannot know if bits of the medication have already been absorbed by his body. The only correct action is to visit the specialist.

How long does it take for a poisoned dog to die?

We have not stopped repeating again and again throughout this article that the only logical reaction you have to have in case you see that your dog has eaten something weird, that you think he has done it, or that you have the slightest suspicion: go visit the vet. The problem is that we are talking about an issue that can cost him his life.

If the symptoms have already manifested, if he vomits, if his pupils are dilated, and he has vomited, he may die quickly. So, please, for his sake, visit a veterinarian. If you have any doubts, send us your question without obligation.